Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

Stop internet shutdowns and promote freedom of expression and access to information online and offline.

The Democratic Republic of Congo is a country located in Central Africa with a population estimate of 95.2 million. Its 2005 Constitution provides for various human rights including the rights to expression, privacy, association and assembly and many more. Despite these constitutional guarantees, freedom of expression and civil liberties are subject to severe restrictions. Media groups face intense government censorship and surveillance. Journalists are frequently targeted with threats, physical attacks and arbitrary arrest. The government imposes internet shutdowns to control the flow of information. Multiple state-directed shutdowns have been documented since December 2011, and their increasing frequency poses a grave threat to freedom of expression and access to information in the DRC.

  • Households icon

    1%

    Households with internet access in 2020

  • Households icon

    14%

    Individuals using internet in 2020

  • Households icon

    0

    Fixed Broadband Subscriptions per 100 inhabitants in 2020

  • Households icon

    125/180

    Press Freedom Ranking in 2022

Upr cycle

Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was last reviewed in May 2019. Their next review is in 18 months, which is scheduled for May 2024. It is currently in the National Consultation phase of its UPR cycle. To find out more about the UPR lifecycle click on the Uproar Tools button

Digital Rights and Free Expression Recommendations

Cycle 1
09
Cycle 2
01
12
Cycle 3
04
15
Cycle 4

Resources

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      Partner organisations

      Over a hundred local and international human rights organisations are part of the wider Uproar programme. You can find them listed here.

      Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) cluster

      The country clusters are a local working group in each Uproar target country made up of our partner organisations. The clusters are organised by local lead organisations, who then coordinate local civil society and human rights defenders with digital rights expertise to engage in national-level advocacy and campaigning.